Afghanistan Fears Breakdown of Geopolitical Regional Consensus Impacting Stability | Security Risks Asia Made with Humane Club

Afghanistan Fears Breakdown of Geopolitical Regional Consensus Impacting Stability

Published Oct 03, 2018
Updated Jul 06, 2020

Caught in this geopolitical and regional cleft, it is natural for the deputy foreign minister to call for a consensus on Afghanistan among world powers and countries in the region to bring peace and stability to his country.

Hekmat Khalil Karzai, the Deputy Foreign Minister Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA) of Afghanistan expressed grave concerns over breakdown of international consensus on peace and stability in the country which could be a cause for deterioration of the situation leading to a crisis that may replicate the situation in Syria if not contained.

Speaking on Afghanistan’s foreign policy at Afghanistan Law and Political Studies Organization in Kabul on 02 October, Karzai said, “The tensions are slowly moving from Ukraine toward Afghanistan. It will be a bad situation for Afghanistan when the tensions officially begin in Afghanistan.” “Our goal should be to once again strengthen the consensus that Afghanistan’s stability should be important for Russia even now,” he added as per Tolonews.

Karzai who is also involved in the talks between Afghanistan and Pakistan appealed to Islamabad for supporting peace in the country.

He was also not hopeful that Chinese pressure on Pakistan to contribute to the peace process will lead to a change. “We should not expect China to put pressure on Pakistan ‘automatically’, because such an expectation is improper. We should recognize China’s benefits (for us). China has invested $48 billion in CPEC (China–Pakistan Economic Corridor) only. How much it has invested in Afghanistan? What is the difference between China’s benefit in Afghanistan and Pakistan? We should recognize this,” said Karzai.

India’s Ambassador to Kabul, Vinay Kumar who also spoke at the event outlined the need for putting pressure on countries supporting terrorism implying Pakistan. “The first thing that everybody has to agree on is to stop all support for terrorism. Unless that is done, you cannot have regional cooperation, you cannot have regional integrity,” said Kumar.

It is now well established that breakdown of consensus between the US/Europe and Russia on Ukraine in 2013 has been followed by the controversial sanctions on Moscow on varied grounds.

Russia on the other hand feels that NATO is not doing enough in Afghanistan to address its interests mainly of the spread of Islamic State to Central Asia.

Russia operated the Northern Distribution Network a supply line which was a crucial alternative to the precarious link through Pakistan which was susceptible to being cut off by Islamabad on occurrence of serious differences with NATO but has now closed this link.

Moscow is also directly engaging Pakistan much to the chagrin of long standing strategic partner India with the hope of roping in the country to push Taliban to the peace talks while it has engaged directly with the rebel group and hopes for a round table in Moscow in the presence of Afghan government representatives

The United States on the other hand has accused Russia of supporting the Taliban by providing weapons and muntions. Former US and NATO commander General John Nicholson openly accused Russia of aiding the militants.

The United States is also shifting dependency of the Afghan National Defence and Security Forces from Russian to American equipment including the well liked Mi17 helicopters to the AK series of rifles.

Caught in this geopolitical and regional cleft, it is natural for the deputy foreign minister to call for a consensus on Afghanistan among world powers and countries in the region to bring peace and stability to his country.

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